MTV Canada Says Viewership Down, YouTube Broke It

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From Marketing:

“Bell Media is cutting 91 employees from its production staff as it makes big changes to programming, with the brunt of the losses hitting music channels Much, MTV and M3.

The layoffs are part of a previously announced plan for Bell Media, a subsidiary of BCE Inc., to cut 120 jobs from its Toronto workforce due to “financial pressure” in its advertising and subscription TV services. (…)

Shows that were scrapped on MTV Canada include 1 Girl, 5 Gays, Losing It, MTV News and After Degrassi, a roundtable discussion that aired after episodes of Degrassi: The Next Generation.

On Much, Video On Trial, The Wedge and Today’s Top 10s received the axe, while the CTV/E! entertainment news series Movie Night was also cancelled. (…)

For several years, executives at Bell have been urging the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission to let them make changes to Much that would scale back its requirements for showing music videos.

They argue that the popularity of YouTube has sapped its viewership as more teenagers log onto their computers for instant access to their favourite artists.

Under its current licence, the speciality channel must show 12 hours of music videos per day. A request filed with the CRTC in 2010 to cut that amount in half was shot down. MTV has a different type of licence and doesn’t air music videos.”

http://www.marketingmag.ca/media/big-changes-at-mtv-much-as-bell-media-makes-deep-cuts-to-production-staff-119599

NBC Not Drinking Twitter’s Viewership Kool-Aid Yet

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(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From Recode:

“You know how Twitter is supposed to be TV’s friend?

Things look a little less congenial today.

That’s after a pointed article in the Financial Times, where a top NBC executive says that Twitter’s most important selling point to the TV industry — “We’ll deliver eyeballs to your shows” — hasn’t panned out.

That’s a red flag for Twitter, which has been trying to create a symbiosis with the TV Industrial Complex for years, and is selling that link to investors as well.

But there’s no there there, says NBCUniversal* research chief Alan Wurtzel.

He comes to that conclusion after looking at the effect of Twitter, as well as Facebook, on NBCU’s ratings during the Winter Olympics. Wurtzel saw lots of chatter about Sochi on social media, but none of that seemed to translate to increased viewership.”

http://recode.net/2014/04/28/nbc-pokes-a-hole-in-twitters-tv-story/